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Matthew V. Brockmeyer, Kind Nepenthe review


Reviewed by Paula Limbaugh

Whoa, where to begin? Kind Nepenthe is one effed up read! Talk about a train spiraling out of control, Matthew V. Brockmeyer gives us a story with realistic characters you will either empathize with or despise.

Old school hippies, Rebecca and Calendula along with her young daughter Megan think they have found the ideal way to make some money while still staying true to their living off the land beliefs. An acquaintance, Coyote needs someone to watch over his marijuana plants on his compound hidden away in a now-defunct logging camp up in Northern California while away on business. They take him up on his offer, despite the fact rumors abound that the compound is haunted.

With Rebecca’s story going on in the foreground we find Diesel’s in the background. Diesel’s a mess. A burnt-out meth dealer who has seen better days he is still stewing over the fact that Coyote’s compound is really his property. Mix in his hothead son who feels that dad hasn’t done enough to get back the property and you just know trouble is brewing.

It’s little Megan that first sees the ghosts. At first, Rebecca chalks it off to an overactive imagination and the lack of playmates, but soon enough strange things begin occurring. When Coyote returns with another offer for them to stay and help with the next crop of plants Rebecca balks, but Calendula persuades her to re-up one more time. What a mistake!

The air is heavy with an evil foreboding, as the characters begin to fall into place in their part of this disastrous telling. You start to dread the turning of the page as you know it isn’t going to be good.  You want to yell, No, don’t. But, it’s too late. The die has been cast and you just have to roll with it.

Brockmeyer’s debut novel has all the elements of a memorable story. Can’t wait to see what he comes out with next. You can pick up your copy HERE!!

5/5  kind nepenthe

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