New Reviews

Aaron Dries & Mark Allan Gunnells, Where the Dead Go to Die review


Written by Paula Limbaugh

Every once, in a while, you read a book that just floors you. The story so strong that you know emotionally it will be with you for a long time. These books are those rare gems that make you wonder how much of the author’s soul was put into that story, what price did they pay to bare such raw feelings?

Aaron Dries and Mark Allan Gunnells have written one such story, Where the Dead Go to Die is a story that is about more than what is on the surface, as you begin to read you realize, hey… this could be about me, my grandmother, my neighbor, my child, about anyone I’ve loved and lost.

Using the zombie infection premise the authors have put together a story of the aftermath. The infection is now being contained with care. The infected are allowed to live in a hospice environment until the change takes hold and then given mercy before they can do any harm. Of course, as in any situation, there are those opposed to this care for the infected and protest daily outside hospices across the country.

Emily and her daughter live in Chicago, where Emily works in one such facility. Day in, day out Emily walks amongst the infected seeing to their needs until it time for the Ministry to come in and give them an end to their suffering. The government has decided this is a more humane way to stop the spread of infection rather than just killing an infected person on sight. And here lies an age-old question regarding any terminal illness, is it really the best way to go? Knowing you will never be cured, being kept alive through all the ravages your body must go through until you are released just so others can hold on a bit more to the reality they once knew. It seems cruel when put that way and yet, aren’t we all are guilty of such actions, the finality of death is a hard burden to bear.

The job is just that, a job to Emily until the day Robbie a twelve-year-old boy is dropped off at the hospice, his family abandoning him as they can’t accept his fate. Emily forms a bond with Robbie and allows her 10-year-old daughter Lucette to develop a friendship with him. Lucette, growing up in this time of infection knows the rules, there is no cure to be offered to the infected just comfort. But, alas, complacency sets in as the days go by until that one fatal morning…

You can remove the word infected and in its place, use the words dementia, AIDS, terminal cancer, etc., and the results would be the same. The feelings of hopelessness and loss are strong and yet knowing this we still fear release, finality. Be prepared to be emotional drained, this book is a keeper! Do READ this book, you can pick up your copy HERE! Available in both e-book and paperback format.

Before I go, I should acknowledge the stunning cover art from Ben Baldwin and author Aaron Dries for including pieces of interior artwork. Oh, and did I mention by the time you are finished with this book you will have made a paper crane? Japanese legend says that folding 1000 cranes will grant you one wish, today the paper crane has come to symbolize hope and peace. But… for me, looking at my little not so perfect paper crane is probably the saddest part of the whole story. You’ll understand what I’m talking by the time you are finished reading this book.

Again, READ this book, you will not be disappointed! Get it HERE!

5/5     where-the-dead-go-to-die

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2 Trackbacks / Pingbacks

  1. Reading Links…12/6/16 – Where Genres Collide
  2. 10 Horror Novels Released in 2016 That Will Stick with You in 2017 – Horror Novel Reviews

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