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Michael Scott and Melanie Ruth Rose ‘Mirror Image’ Review

Mirror Image cover

Written by: Matt Molgaard

The prolific Michael Scott joins forces with Melanie Ruth Rose to craft a high-speed chiller that’s as infectious as it is gruesome. And believe this: it’s really, really gruesome. The bright side? It isn’t gruesome to the extent of gratuity. No, this is a savage tale that’s delivered with as much class as the story can allow for. So it’s safe to anticipate a savage story, but dismiss the notion of over-the-top grotesqueries, for thankfully neither Scott nor Rose insist on churning out trashy material. Mirror Image is handled with care.

Our primary focus falls on Jonathan Frazer, an antique dealer who finds himself under the impression he’s scoring a damn fine deal when he purchases a massive vintage mirror. The truth is, it’s a plain and somewhat ugly thing, but Frazer knows he’s looking at a mirror that’s centuries old, and he’s holding out hope that he can flip the antique for big bucks. But the mirror has other plans, as something lives within the distorted reflective glass… something thirsty for blood. Will Frazer have the sense to ditch the mirror or will the images it shows suck him into an existence akin to hell?

The book is very well written. The different narratives weave together to meld into one infectious horror mystery. It’s a technically crisp piece that really does speed along rather quickly, leaving readers little to no down time. And that, along with the general idea, are the two elements that push the story forward, and quickly at that. But that doesn’t mean Mirror Image is without its flaws.

I like how the story jumps around and introduces us to a slew of differing characters, however I have one major complaint with the story. There is no clear protagonist to root for. Even if you plan to end things on a terrifying and unforgiving note (I’m not saying the story does that), you’ve got to have someone to really care for as the story moves forward. Without that defined protagonist, there’s always a piece of you that can’t quite attach yourself to the story.

That’s precisely what happens in this book.

I’m not going to give any of the details away. I know that being this vague is a pain, but there are some cool surprises in store, including a bad guy that could’ve walked straight out of an old Bond film. So there are qualities worth exploring for yourself. But, don’t fall too in love with the idea of pronounced hero, because there isn’t one here. That, admittedly, left me a little disappointed.

The degree to which you enjoy this story likely hinges on personal structure preferences. If you like traditional tales of this nature, you may not dig it. If you like to see a story toy with the rules about, it might be the best book you’ll read all year. It’s tricky in that sense. Me, I love a little bit of everything, so it worked out pretty well. This is a strong and engaging read.

Order it here.

Rating: 3.5/5

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About The Overseer (1663 Articles)
Author of Say No to Drugs, writer for Blumhouse, Dread Central, Horror Novel Reviews and Addicted to Horror Movies.

3 Comments on Michael Scott and Melanie Ruth Rose ‘Mirror Image’ Review

  1. Excellent review. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I agree you have done an excellent review here…. Thanks for enough of it to draw me in.. I do like books that do break rules without losing you after a few pages…

    Like

  3. I felt much the same – I enjoyed it, buuut I like having someone to root for and there wasn’t really that character here!

    Like

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