New Reviews

William Meikle ‘The Auld Mither’ Review


ddbf365259d9035d8d93cf197cd8585d133f43e2

Written by: Drake Morgan

The ancient Celtic societies that still pocket the Isles are a treasure-trove of legends, myths, and horrific stories that lurk in the shadows. William Meikle’s novella, The Auld Mither, heads to Scotland and delves into the legend of the hag famous among the Gaelic peoples. References to the auld mither can be found in a number of Scottish writings, including the poetry of Jeremiah Eames Rankin. The hag is traditionally depicted as an old woman, wizened and magical, but tinged with a sinister edge. Using this legend, Meikle weaves a dark, fantastical tale of fear, legend, local superstition, and the fine line between them all.

No one really believes in fairies, leprechauns, and magic these days. Come now. George Duncan certainly did not. Neither did his two children. This was after all, modern day Scotland. It wasn’t the land of the wee people and ancient spirits. Meikle creates strong, believable characters and we the readers do not believe any more than they do. Or do we? The narrative skillfully draws us into a world not seen or experienced for centuries, but one that lives in the crags and moors under a blanket of fog across the Isle countries to this day. By the end, we believe. As Meikle also reminds us, those with Celtic blood have always believed. We just need reminded. This easily could have been developed into a full-length novel and the subject definitely deserves such a treatment. Great read.

Order The Auld Mither here.

Rating: 5/5

About The Overseer (1669 Articles)
Author of Say No to Drugs, writer for Blumhouse, Dread Central, Horror Novel Reviews and Addicted to Horror Movies.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: